the reverse darkroom

A GAZE AND AN APPROACH TO FRAMING

CLICK TO WATCH: Sunday in Balham (extract one, one minute, extract two, one minute)
Made on the Thinking Through Making workshop
Two excerpts from a study made at a screening of A Forgotten Odyssey, a documentary about the deportation of Poles during WW2 made by my mother. Without going into too much detail, the ‘cottage industry’ film became an important document that has travelled through generations among the diaspora, particularly in the UK. It is a multi-layered 'object' for me. This screening took place at a Polish club in London.

                                                            (i)

It’s Lisbon, a few days before the first days of 2019. An unlikely nocturnal encounter with a rooster crowing not at the crack of dawn, but at midnight, cements a new position for sound in my research. I begin to see it as another powerful fragment within the frame. Pairing my assumptions about roosters and their body clocks with this fleeting observation of this urban crew pacing the artificial environment of the city, I store this curious encounter for more research later on.  

Maurice Blanchot, Everyday Speech

                                                      (ii)

Taking a defamiliarised gaze on our ordinary surroundings makes us sensitive to new perspectives, aware of the smaller fragments and how they relate to the whole. Spinning around an axis of distraction and attention, the act of unfastening is delicate: it can either result in a messy cacophony of voices, difficult to take anything from, or it can lead to quiet revelations. Coming across Manny Farber’s idea of Termite Art was useful in directing my focus to the SMALL entry points and details.

 

Manny Farber

“A peculiar fact about termite-tapeworm-fungus-moss art is that it goes always forward eating its own boundaries, and, likely as not, leaves nothing in its path other than the signs of eager, industrious, unkempt activity”

- Manny Farber

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